Share On Facebook
Share On Twitter
Share On Google Plus
Share On Youtube

It was 2011 when a major Earthquake shook the east coast of Japan, which proceeded a tsunami that demolished the once quaint prefecture of Fukushima, bringing three Fukushima Daiichi reactors down to the ground resulting in the country’s most devastating nuclear disasters. Simply google the word “Fukushima” and you’ll be hard pressed to find any information on the actual place due to the overwhelming articles specifying that fateful nuclear event.

dominic-nahr-fukushima-08

Five years later and the certain areas are still marked as evacuated danger zones, and remain as ghost town with warnings not to venture in (Japan even needed to put out a “do not go Pokemon Go hunting here” warning to the masses. However if you’re photo journalist with a mission to capture the forefront of global disasters, then no Pokemon Go warning will stop you.

Early on, we heard reports of people hiding from the radiation cloud in buildings along the coast, without help.

This was the case for photographer Dominic Nahr, who managed to explore inside the radiated zones and their inhabited outskirts which resulted in a photo series showcasing the beautifully haunting state of the effected areas today. While the evacuated areas are logical, what surprised Nahr were the surrounding areas that still had an amount of stubborn yet resourceful people occupying spots that are still prone to dangerous levels of radiation. “Early on, we heard reports of people hiding from the radiation cloud in buildings along the coast, without help.” Narh tells Huck Magazine.

dominic-nahr-fukushima-04

While the world is still very much unaware of what’s truly happening over in Fukushima, Nahr’s captivating images and his report to Huck is a good way to start that awareness. So make sure you check that out here and peep through his images in the gallery above.

Powered by WPeMatico

Share →
Show Buttons
Hide Buttons